Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Good-bye Coca-Cola

Well, I've done it. Three weeks ago I said I wasn't ready to give up my Coca-Cola habit, but last Friday after lunch, by some kind of grace, I decided that that would be my last Coke. I poured the last six cans in my refrigerator down the drain in an ad hoc ritual witnessed by Adonis and the dog. I prayed for help. And I haven't touched the stuff - or even been very tempted - since. I figure that's between 7-10 Cokes that I haven't had. I feel great. Whether it's because of less sugar in my diet, or because I feel a lightness from giving up the drug, I don't know. But I do know that I was feeling enslaved to that stuff, and now I'm free. A recovering Coke-aholic.

I've lowered my risk of diabetes and osteoporosis. I'll probably lose some weight without changing anything else. I'm sticking it to the Man. I'm taking a stand for global justice. But none of these were reason enough for me to quit before now, not because I don't care about all of these things, but because I was hooked. I'm addicted. I used Coke to make me feel better. I had to have it. I'd carry my own stash to parties and friends' houses for dinner. There were certain foods that I could only eat with Coke - no pizza, nachos, fried foods, or burgers without it. It was a rare day when I didn't have at least one can. And sometimes, once I got started, I would have 3-4 cans in a day. Sometimes I would travel with a 24-pack in the trunk of my car. When I was feeling nervous, sad, or tired, Coke would always make me feel better.

I finally decided that I didn't want a substance to have that kind of grip on my psyche and body. It took me a loooong time - years - to come to that decision. I'm just grateful it wasn't a diabetes diagnosis that made me give it up. I didn't hit bottom. I was craving freedom more than I was craving Coke. And fortunately, unlike other drugs, Coke isn't intensely physiologically addictive. (It is addictive, but it's easier to quit than alcohol or hard drugs. I wonder if it's comparable to stopping smoking.)

I think it's important to pray to the Goddess for help, and to have some friends I can call when a craving feels unbearable. A friend recommended that I make this change to my diet, and not attempt any other, for three months. I think that's good advice. I'm proud of myself. It feels like a heavy load has been lifted from my psyche.

8 comments:

jo(e) said...

Good for you!

I think the great thing about giving up something that is addictive is that it frees spaces inside of you -- you gain all these empty spaces into which other wonderful things can flow.

Anonymous said...

yay!! very brave. Be strong. it's going to kick up alot of shit not to have your release valve.

Inanna said...

Yes, jo(e), that is exactly how it feels.

Thanks, Anon - fortunately, I have a lot of support in various forms to help me through it and help me deal with the shit that arises.

Thaleia said...

I'm with you... it's always easier if you know someone else is giving up his addiction too. So no more Coke's for me... I've been trying to quit for ages now, but you just gave me the last push to go for it! Thx and we can make this!

Inanna said...

Yay, thaleia! You go! I'm at 11 days and counting....

deborah oak said...

congratulations on saying good-bye to those black waters of imperialism. I occasionally have a diet black waters of
imperialism (believe it or not - i like the tangy metallic taste!)...but your resolve is so inspiring I'm going to just say no to that black water,diet or not!

Inanna said...

The black waters of imperialism! That's perfect. Whenever I get a craving, I'll remember that phrase. Thank you for the congratulations. To you, too!

Rubicon said...

not to mention, by saying no to Coca-Cola, you've also contributed albeit perhaps without knowing it, to ending human rights abuses in Columbia :)